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Magn Reson Imaging. 2010 Jun;28(5):753-66. doi: 10.1016/j.mri.2010.02.001. Epub 2010 Apr 15.

Characterization of cryoinjury-induced infarction with manganese-and gadolinium-enhanced MRI and optical spectroscopy in pig hearts.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate progression of cryoinjury in pigs using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as optical spectroscopy and imaging.

METHODS:

Cryoinjury was produced in 16 pigs in vivo and investigated using Gd-and Mn-enhanced MRI, optical imaging/spectroscopy and histology in acute and chronic setting up to 4 weeks after the injury.

RESULTS:

(1) Acute cryoinjury resulted in formation of a lesion with a severely reduced rate of sub-epicardial indocyanine green (intravascular optical flow tracer) passage. In vivo late Gd-enhanced MRI showed a approximately 10 mm deep hypointense area that was surrounded by a hyperintense rim while ex vivo Mn-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) detected a homogenous hypointense zone. Histological and spectroscopic examination revealed embolic erythrocytes blockages within the cryolesion with a thin necrotic rim neighboring the normal myocardium. (2) Chronic 4-week cryoinjury was characterized by uniform Gd-enhancement, whereas MEMRI revealed reduced Mn(2+)enhancement. Histological examination showed replacement of the cryoinjured myocardium by scar tissue.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acute cryoinjury resulted in formation of a no-reflow core embolized by erythrocytes and surrounded by a rim of necrotic tissue. Upon injury progression, the no-reflow zone shrunk and was completely replaced with scar tissue by 4 weeks after injury.

PMID:
20395099
DOI:
10.1016/j.mri.2010.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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