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Thromb Res. 2010 Jul;126(1):56-60. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2010.03.001. Epub 2010 Apr 10.

Direct comparison of enoxaparin and nadroparin in a rabbit model of arterial thrombosis prevention.

Author information

1
University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, and st. Ann's Faculty Hosital Brno, Czech Republic. vlasinm@vfu.cz

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of standard unfractionated heparin (UFH) and low-molecular weight heparins (LMWH's).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We modified a previously published rabbit model of arterial thrombosis prevention [1,2] to compare unfractionated heparin and two different doses of two low-molecular weight heparin fragments--nadroparin and enoxaparin. Thrombosis in the distal aorta was triggered by vessel wall injury and critical stenosis. Blood flow in the damaged arterial segment was monitored by a flow probe placed distal to the constrictor. The primary endpoints of the study were: (1) cumulative flow, (2) time to occlusion and (3) residual clot weight. Thirty six animals were split into 6 groups with six animals in each group. Control groups were given saline or heparin and four more groups were used to compare LMWH's at 2 different doses.

RESULTS:

In our study, all treatments were superior to the saline control group (alpha<or=0,01). Standard heparin was inferior (alpha<or=0,05) to both low molecular weight heparins for all primary endpoints (cumulative flow, time to occlusion and residual clot weight). There were no differences between the LMWH's except for cumulative flow at high doses.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study revealed no relevant differences between nadroparin and enoxaparin for the primary endpoints of our model. Clinical use of each drug remains a personal preference.

PMID:
20382412
DOI:
10.1016/j.thromres.2010.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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