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Neurosci Lett. 2010 May 31;476(2):62-5. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2010.04.003. Epub 2010 Apr 8.

Immunization with neural-derived antigens inhibits lipid peroxidation after spinal cord injury.

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1
Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Anáhuac México Norte, Av. Universidad Anáhuac No. 46, Col. Lomas Anáhuac, Huixquilucan Edo. de México, Mexico. iantonio65@yahoo.com

Abstract

Lipid peroxidation (LP) is one of the most harmful mechanisms developed after spinal cord (SC) injury. Several strategies have been explored in order to control this phenomenon. Protective autoimmunity is a physiological process based on the modulation of inflammatory cells that can be boosted by immunizing with neural-derived peptides, such as A91. Since inflammatory cells are among the main contributors to lipid peroxidation, we hypothesized that protective autoimmunity could reduce LP after SC injury. In order to test this hypothesis, we designed two experiments in SC contused rats. First, animals were immunized with a neural-derived peptide seven days before injury. With the aim of inducing the functional elimination of CNS-specific T cells, for the second experiment, animals were tolerized against SC-protein extract and thereafter subjected to a SC injury. The lipid-soluble fluorescent products were used as an index of lipid peroxidation and were assessed after injury. Immunization with neural-derived peptides reduced lipid peroxidation after SC injury. Functional elimination of CNS-specific T cells avoided the beneficial effect induced by protective autoimmunity. The present study demonstrates the beneficial effect of immunizing with neural-derived peptides on lipid peroxidation inhibition; besides this, it also provides evidence on the neuroprotective mechanisms exerted by protective autoimmunity.

PMID:
20381587
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2010.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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