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Psychol Med. 2010 Dec;40(12):2089-100. doi: 10.1017/S0033291710000590. Epub 2010 Apr 12.

Predictability of oppositional defiant disorder and symptom dimensions in children and adolescents with ADHD combined type.

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1
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, Switzerland. maebi@ppkj.uzh.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is frequently co-occurring with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. Because ODD is a precursor of later conduct disorder (CD) and affective disorders, early diagnostic identification is warranted. Furthermore, the predictability of three recently confirmed ODD dimensions (ODD-irritable, ODD-headstrong and ODD-hurtful) may assist clinical decision making.

METHOD:

Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used in order to test the diagnostic accuracy of the Conners' Parent Rating Scale revised (CPRS-R) and the parent version of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (PSDQ) in the prediction of ODD in a transnational sample of 1093 subjects aged 5-17 years from the International Multicentre ADHD Genetics study. In a second step, the prediction of three ODD dimensions by the same parent rating scales was assessed by backward linear regression analyses.

RESULTS:

ROC analyses showed adequate diagnostic accuracy of the CPRS-R and the PSDQ in predicting ODD in this ADHD sample. Furthermore, the three-dimensional structure of ODD was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis and the CPRS-R emotional lability scale significantly predicted the ODD irritable dimension.

CONCLUSIONS:

The PSDQ and the CPRS-R are both suitable screening instruments in the identification of ODD. The emotional lability scale of the CPRS-R is an adequate predictor of irritability in youth referred for ADHD.

PMID:
20380783
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291710000590
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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