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Toxicol Sci. 2010 Aug;116(2):364-74. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfq103. Epub 2010 Apr 2.

Long-term consequences of fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure: a critical review.

Author information

1
Reproductive Biology Division, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is associated with numerous obstetrical, fetal, and developmental complications, as well as an increased risk of adverse health consequences in the adult offspring. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has been developed as a pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation and is considered to be a safer alternative for women to smoking during pregnancy. The safety of NRT use during pregnancy has been evaluated in a limited number of short-term human trials, but there is currently no information on the long-term effects of developmental nicotine exposure in humans. However, animal studies suggest that nicotine alone may be a key chemical responsible for many of the long-term effects associated with maternal cigarette smoking on the offspring, such as impaired fertility, type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, neurobehavioral defects, and respiratory dysfunction. This review will examine the long-term effects of fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure on postnatal health.

PMID:
20363831
PMCID:
PMC2905398
DOI:
10.1093/toxsci/kfq103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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