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Med Decis Making. 2010 Nov-Dec;30(6):639-50. doi: 10.1177/0272989X10364246. Epub 2010 Mar 30.

Development of inpatient risk stratification models of acute kidney injury for use in electronic health records.

Author information

1
Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Tennessee Valley Health System, Veterans Health Administration, Nashville, TN, USA. michael.matheny@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Patients with hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased mortality and further medical complications. Evaluating these patients with a prediction tool easily implemented within an electronic health record (EHR) would identify high-risk patients prior to the development of AKI and could prevent iatrogenically induced episodes of AKI and improve clinical management.

METHODS:

The authors used structured clinical data acquired from an EHR to identify patients with normal kidney function for admissions from 1 August 1999 to 31 July 2003. Using administrative, computerized provider order entry and laboratory test data, they developed a 3-level risk stratification model to predict each of 2 severity levels of in-hospital AKI as defined by RIFLE criteria. The severity levels were defined as 150% or 200% of baseline serum creatinine. Model discrimination and calibration were evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation.

RESULTS:

Cross-validation of the models resulted in area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curves of 0.75 (150% elevation) and 0.78 (200% elevation). Both models were adequately calibrated as measured by the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test chi-squared values of 9.7 (P = 0.29) and 12.7 (P = 0.12), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors generated risk prediction models for hospital-acquired AKI using only commonly available electronic data. The models identify patients at high risk for AKI who might benefit from early intervention or increased monitoring.

PMID:
20354229
PMCID:
PMC4850549
DOI:
10.1177/0272989X10364246
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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