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Epidemiol Rev. 2010;32:56-69. doi: 10.1093/epirev/mxq004. Epub 2010 Mar 30.

Text messaging as a tool for behavior change in disease prevention and management.

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1
Yale University School of Epidemiology and Public Health, PO Box 208034, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. heather.cole-lewis@yale.edu

Abstract

Mobile phone text messaging is a potentially powerful tool for behavior change because it is widely available, inexpensive, and instant. This systematic review provides an overview of behavior change interventions for disease management and prevention delivered through text messaging. Evidence on behavior change and clinical outcomes was compiled from randomized or quasi-experimental controlled trials of text message interventions published in peer-reviewed journals by June 2009. Only those interventions using text message as the primary mode of communication were included. Study quality was assessed by using a standardized measure. Seventeen articles representing 12 studies (5 disease prevention and 7 disease management) were included. Intervention length ranged from 3 months to 12 months, none had long-term follow-up, and message frequency varied. Of 9 sufficiently powered studies, 8 found evidence to support text messaging as a tool for behavior change. Effects exist across age, minority status, and nationality. Nine countries are represented in this review, but it is problematic that only one is a developing country, given potential benefits of such a widely accessible, relatively inexpensive tool for health behavior change. Methodological issues and gaps in the literature are highlighted, and recommendations for future studies are provided.

PMID:
20354039
PMCID:
PMC3082846
DOI:
10.1093/epirev/mxq004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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