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BMC Infect Dis. 2010 Mar 30;10:82. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-10-82.

Entry screening to delay local transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1).

Author information

1
School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. bcowling@hku.hk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

After the WHO issued the global alert for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1), many national health agencies began to screen travelers on entry in airports, ports and border crossings to try to delay local transmission.

METHODS:

We reviewed entry screening policies adopted by different nations and ascertained dates of official report of the first laboratory-confirmed imported H1N1 case and the first laboratory-confirmed untraceable or 'local' H1N1 case.

RESULTS:

Implementation of entry screening policies was associated with on average additional 7-12 day delays in local transmission compared to nations that did not implement entry screening, with lower bounds of 95% confidence intervals consistent with no additional delays and upper bounds extending to 20-30 day additional delays.

CONCLUSIONS:

Entry screening may lead to short-term delays in local transmission of a novel strain of influenza virus. The resources required for implementation should be balanced against the expected benefits of entry screening.

PMID:
20353566
PMCID:
PMC3152767
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2334-10-82
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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