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Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jul;34(7):1191-2. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2010.60. Epub 2010 Mar 30.

No evidence of large differences in mother-daughter and father-son body mass index concordance in a large UK birth cohort.

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1
Lifecourse Epidemiology and Population Oral Health Research Group, Department of Oral and Dental Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK. s.d.leary@bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

It has recently been suggested that there are substantial differences in mother-daughter and father-son associations of body mass index and obesity among contemporary UK children, but much larger studies of older cohorts have failed to find evidence of substantial sex-specific effects. We have tested this hypothesis using the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a large contemporary cohort. Our analyses are based on 4654 complete parent-offspring trios (2323 with male offspring and 2331 with female offspring, all aged approximately 7.5 years). We found maternal body mass index to be a little more strongly associated with female than with male offspring body mass index (beta=0.18 (95% confidence interval 0.16-0.20) for females vs 0.13 (0.12, 0.15) for males). However, associations between paternal body mass index and male compared with female offspring were very similar (beta=0.16 (0.14, 0.19) for females vs 0.15 (0.12, 0.17) for males). Hence, our study suggests that there is no compelling reason to integrate the belief that there are large differences in parent-offspring body mass index associations with obesity prevention strategies.

PMID:
20351737
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2010.60
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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