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Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2010 May;16(2):64-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2009.10.002. Epub 2009 Nov 14.

Effects of SP6 acupressure on pain and menstrual distress in young women with dysmenorrhea.

Author information

1
Room 621, Esther Lee Building, The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR. jojowong@cuhk.edu.hk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aims to evaluate the effects of Sanyinjiao (SP6) acupressure in reducing the pain level and menstrual distress resulting from dysmenorrhea.

METHODS:

Forty participants with dysmenorrhea were assigned to either the acupressure group (n = 19) or the control group (n = 21). The acupressure group received 20 min of SP6 acupressure during the initial intervention session and was taught to perform the technique for them to do twice a day from the first to third days of their menstrual cycle, 3 months subsequent to the first session. In contrast, the control group was only told to rest. Outcomes were measured through (1) the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (PVAS), (2) the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and (3) the Short-Form Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (SF-MDQ).

RESULTS:

There was a statistically significant decrease in pain score for PVAS (p = 0.003) and SF-MPQ (p = 0.02) immediately after the 20 min of SP6 acupressure. In the self-care periods, significant reduction of PVAS (p = 0.008), SF-MPQ (p = 0.012), and SF-MDQ (p = 0.024) scores was noted in the third month of post-intervention.

CONCLUSIONS:

SP6 acupressure has an immediate pain-relieving effect for dysmenorrhea. Moreover, acupressure applied to the SP6 acupoint for 3 consecutive months was effective in relieving both the pain and menstrual distress level resulting from dysmenorrhea.

PMID:
20347835
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2009.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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