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J Pediatr. 2010 Jul;157(1):74-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.01.008. Epub 2010 Mar 24.

Late preterm birth and risk of developing asthma.

Author information

1
Maternal and Infant Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA. kabe@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the association between gestational age at birth (late preterm vs term) and risk for physician-diagnosed asthma.

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) linked natality files. The study included children age 2-83 months from singleton births, born late preterm (n=537) or term (n=5650). Using survival analysis, we modeled time to diagnosis of asthma; children with no asthma diagnosis were censored at the age of their survey interview. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for gestational age and asthma risk, adjusting for maternal age, maternal education, parental history of asthma/hay fever, maternal smoking history during pregnancy, race/ethnicity, and sex of the child.

RESULTS:

Adjusted analysis showed that physician-diagnosed asthma was modestly associated with late preterm birth (hazard ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-2.0), but this association was not statistically significant (P=.30).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study found that late preterm birth was not associated with a diagnosis of asthma in early childhood.

PMID:
20338577
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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