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Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;64(6):372-6. doi: 10.3109/08039481003710204. Epub 2010 Mar 26.

Commitment to coercive care in relation to substance abuse reports to the social services. A 2-year follow-up.

Author information

1
Clinical Alcohol Research, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. marianne.larsson_lindahl@med.lu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Sweden, a person with substance abuse can be reported to the social services for an investigation about commitment to coercive care. After a change in legislation, municipalities varied greatly in the ratio of commitments/reports compared with the period before the legislation was amended.

AIMS:

The primary aims of this study were first, to investigate whether subjects from municipalities with a high ratio of commitments/reports have a better outcome compared with subjects from municipalities with a low ratio and second, if a high ratio has an impact on mortality.

METHODS:

The study involved two municipalities with high ratio of commitments/reports with 56 cases reported for substance abuse including 31 committed cases (55%). It also included two municipalities with a low ratio, 50 reported cases including six committed cases (12%). Two social service inspectors at the country administrative board assessed the cases in terms of severity of addiction according to legal criteria (κ(s)=0.66), indicating good inter-rater agreement. A global index based on information about substance abuse, employment and housing was used as outcome measure at the 2-year follow-up.

RESULTS:

Global outcome did not differ between cases from high- and low-ratio municipalities. Seven subjects had deceased because of causes related to substance abuse. None of the deceased had been committed to coercive care.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

In conclusion, the different ratios of commitments/reports did not influence global outcome. Commitment may reduce substance-related deaths.

PMID:
20337568
DOI:
10.3109/08039481003710204
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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