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J Health Serv Res Policy. 2010 Jul;15(3):143-9. doi: 10.1258/jhsrp.2009.009032. Epub 2010 Mar 22.

Cost-effectiveness of a programme to detect and provide better care for female victims of intimate partner violence.

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1
Centre for Health Economic Research and Evaluation, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Primary care clinicians often fail to detect women who are victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). Our aim was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of a programme in primary care to detect and support such women.

METHODS:

We developed a Markov model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of education and support for primary care clinicians to increase their identification of survivors of IPV and to refer them to a specialist advocacy agency or a psychologist with specialist skills. The programme was implemented in three general practices in the United Kingdom (with an additional practice acting as a control) and provided cost data and rates of identification and referral. Other cost data and the effectiveness of IPV advocacy came from published sources.

RESULTS:

The model gave an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of approximately pounds sterling 2,450 per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Although the ratio increased in some of the sensitivity analyses, most were under a conventional willingness to pay threshold (pounds sterling 30,000/QALY).

CONCLUSIONS:

While there is considerable uncertainty in the underlying parameters, a training programme for primary care teams to increase identification and referral of women experiencing IPV is likely to be cost-effective.

PMID:
20308226
DOI:
10.1258/jhsrp.2009.009032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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