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Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2010 May;22(3):299-306. doi: 10.1097/BOR.0b013e328337c95a.

Angiogenesis and vasculogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis.

Author information

1
Department of Rheumatology, Institute of Medicine, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Sciences Center, Hungary. szekanecz.zoltan@med.unideb.hu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Angiogenesis is the formation of new capillaries from pre-existing vessels, whereas vasculogenesis is de-novo capillary formation from endothelial precursor cells (EPCs). Current understanding of the role of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and possibilities of therapeutic intervention should be summarized.

RECENT FINDINGS:

There have been many recent studies on the role of the hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-angiopoietin axis in angiogenesis associated with RA. The role of additional growth factors, chemokines, cytokines, matrix components and adhesion molecules has been further characterized. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) may link inflammation, angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) and focal adhesion kinases (FAKs) have recently been implicated in inflammatory angiogenesis. Novel information regarding the role of serum amyloid A (SAA) and sphingosine kinase has become available. Most of these angiogenic factors have recently been targeted using various techniques and arthritis models. Whereas angiogenesis is abundant in RA, there is defective EPC function and vasculogenesis leading to atherosclerosis and vascular disease in arthritis. Treatment with EPCs already under investigation in vascular diseases may also be attempted in RA.

SUMMARY:

Targeting angiogenesis and restoration of vasculogenesis may be beneficial for the therapy and outcome of RA.

PMID:
20305562
DOI:
10.1097/BOR.0b013e328337c95a
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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