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Biol Psychol. 2010 May;84(2):325-9. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.03.013. Epub 2010 Mar 17.

Cortisol response to the Trier Social Stress Test in obese and reduced obese individuals.

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1
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

Impact of body weight loss, body fat distribution and the nutritional status on the cortisol response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was investigated in this study. Fifty-one men (17 non-obese, 20 abdominally obese and 14 reduced obese) and 28 women (12 non-obese, 10 peripherally obese and 6 reduced obese) were subjected to the TSST in fed and fasted states. The TSST response was determined using salivary cortisol measurements. The nutritional status (being fed or fasted) had no effect on the cortisol levels during and following the TSST. Reduced obese men exhibited lower cortisol levels than non-obese men. Cortisol levels in obese men were not different from those of non-obese and reduced obese subjects. In women, there was no significant difference between groups. These finding suggest that weight status in men influences cortisol reactivity to a psychological stress and the different responses seen among genders could be linked to the different fat distributions that characterize men and women.

PMID:
20302906
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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