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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2010 Oct;140(4):816-22, 822.e1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2009.11.042. Epub 2010 Mar 17.

Fourteen years' experience with 501 subcoronary Ross procedures: surgical details and results.

Author information

1
University of Lübeck, Department of Cardiac and Thoracic Vascular Surgery, Lübeck, Germany. sievers@medinf.mu-luebeck.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

During the past decade the Ross procedure using the full root has become the predominant surgical technique. However, progressive autograft dilatation and eventual failure remain a concern. Here we report on the surgical techniques and results of the subcoronary technique over a 14-year period.

METHODS:

A total of 501 patients (mean age, 44.9 ± 12.9 years; 117 female; 384 male) were operated on from June 1994 to December 2007. The follow-up database, with a completeness of 98.2%, was closed on December 2008, comprising of 2931 patient-years with a mean follow-up of 5.9 ± 3.6 years (range, 0.1-14.1 years).

RESULTS:

Surgical details are presented. Early and late mortality were 0.4% (n = 2) and 4% (n = 20), respectively, valve-related mortality was 1.2% (n = 6), whereas the overall survival did not differ from that of the normal population. Neurologic events occurred in 22 patients, major bleeding in 9, autograft endocarditis in 8, and homograft endocarditis in 10. Freedom from autograft and homograft reoperation was 91.9% at 10 years. For the majority of patients, hemodynamics was excellent and no root dilatation was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Midterm results after the original subcoronary Ross procedure are excellent, including normal survival and low risk of valve-related morbidity. Longer-term results are necessary for continuous judgment of the subcoronary technique.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00708409.

PMID:
20299029
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2009.11.042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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