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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Mar;91(3):407-13. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2009.10.030.

5-repetition sit-to-stand test in subjects with chronic stroke: reliability and validity.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the (1) intrarater, interrater, and test-retest reliability of the 5-repetition sit-to-stand test (5-repetition STS test) scores, (2) correlation of 5-repetition STS test scores with lower-limb muscle strength and balance performance, and (3) cut-off scores among the 3 groups of subjects: the young, the healthy elderly, and subjects with stroke.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

University-based rehabilitation center.

PARTICIPANTS:

A convenience sample of 36 subjects: 12 subjects with chronic stroke, 12 healthy elderly subjects, and 12 young subjects.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

5-Repetition STS test time scores; hand-held dynamometer measurements of hip flexors, and knee flexors and extensors; ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors muscle strength; Berg Balance Scale (BBS); and limits of stability (LOS) test using dynamic posturography.

RESULTS:

Excellent intrarater reliability of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (range, .970-.976), interrater reliability (ICC=.999), and test-retest reliability (ICC range, .989-.999) were found. Five-repetition STS test scores were also found to be significantly associated with the muscle strength of affected and unaffected knee flexors (rho=-.753 to -.830; P<.00556) of the subjects with stroke. No significant associations were found between 5-repetition STS test and BBS and LOS tests in subjects with stroke. Cut-off scores of 12 seconds were found to be discriminatory between healthy elderly and subjects with stroke at a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 75%.

CONCLUSIONS:

The 5-repetition STS test is a reliable measurement tool that correlates with knee flexors muscle strength but not balance ability in subjects with stroke.

PMID:
20298832
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2009.10.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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