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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2010 Mar;34(1):46-57.

The effect of tone-reducing orthotic devices on soleus muscle reflex excitability while standing in patients with spasticity following stroke.

Author information

1
Division of Allied Health, National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia. aibuki@students.latrobe.edu.au

Abstract

Orthoses are commonly prescribed for the management of spasticity but their neurophysiologic effect on spasticity remains unsubstantiated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of three tone-reducing devices (dynamic foot orthosis, muscle stretch, and orthokinetic compression garment) on soleus muscle reflex excitability while standing in patients with spasticity following stroke. A repeated measures intervention study was conducted on 13 patients with stroke selected from a sample of convenience. A custom-made dynamic foot orthosis, a range of motion walker to stretch the soleus muscle and class 1 and class 2 orthokinetic compression garments were assessed using the ratio of maximum Hoffmann reflex amplitude to maximum M-response amplitude (Hmax:Mmax) to determine their effect on soleus muscle reflex excitability. Only 10 subjects were able to complete the testing. There were no significant treatment effects for the interventions (F=1.208, df=3.232, p=0.328); however, when analyzed subject-by-subject, two subjects responded to the dynamic foot orthosis and one of those two subjects also responded to the class 1 orthokinetic compression garment. Overall, the results demonstrated that the tone-reducing devices had no significant effect on soleus reflex excitability suggesting that these tone-reducing orthotic devices have no significant neurophysiologic effect on spasticity.

PMID:
20232496
DOI:
10.3109/03093640903476802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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