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J Rheumatol. 2010 May;37(5):911-6. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.091176. Epub 2010 Mar 15.

Decreased circulating CD28-negative T cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with abatacept are correlated with clinical response.

Author information

1
Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology Service, Spedali Civili and University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To verify the hypothesis that blockade of CD28 costimulation by treatment with abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might induce a reduction in the number of CD28- T cells, as well as other effector T cell populations. We evaluated whether these variations correlate with clinical response.

METHODS:

Peripheral blood T cell subsets were longitudinally evaluated by flow cytometry through the analysis of CD28, CD45RA, and CCR7 expression in 16 patients with RA who were treated with abatacept.

RESULTS:

After 48 weeks of treatment, the proportion and the absolute number of circulating CD8+CD28- T cells decreased (p = 0.008, p = 0.055, respectively, compared with baseline), as well as the proportion of the CD8+CD45RA+CCR7- cells, thought to represent terminally differentiated effector T cells (p = 0.03). Reductions of percentages of circulating CD4+CD28- and CD8+CD28- T cells, and (CCR7-) CD8+ total effector T cells were directly correlated with the reduction of Disease Activity Score 28 C-reactive protein (r = 0.58, p = 0.014; r = 0.47, p = 0.059; r = 0.59, p = 0.012, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

After therapy with abatacept, circulating CD28- T cells and other effector populations decrease in patients with RA. This decrease is correlated with clinical response.

PMID:
20231200
DOI:
10.3899/jrheum.091176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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