Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Contraception. 2010 Apr;81(4):316-22. doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2009.12.004. Epub 2010 Jan 27.

Pregnancy coercion, intimate partner violence and unintended pregnancy.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. elizabeth.miller@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Reproductive control including pregnancy coercion (coercion by male partners to become pregnant) and birth control sabotage (partner interference with contraception) may be associated with partner violence and risk for unintended pregnancy among young adult females utilizing family planning clinic services.

STUDY DESIGN:

A cross-sectional survey was administered to females ages 16-29 years seeking care in five family planning clinics in Northern California (N=1278).

RESULTS:

Fifty-three percent of respondents reported physical or sexual partner violence, 19% reported experiencing pregnancy coercion and 15% reported birth control sabotage. One third of respondents reporting partner violence (35%) also reported reproductive control. Both pregnancy coercion and birth control sabotage were associated with unintended pregnancy (AOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.36-2.46, and AOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.14-2.20, respectively). In analyses stratified by partner violence exposure, associations of reproductive control with unintended pregnancy persisted only among women with a history of partner violence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pregnancy coercion and birth control sabotage are common among young women utilizing family planning clinics, and in the context of partner violence, are associated with increased risk for unintended pregnancy.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center