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J Insect Physiol. 2010 Sep;56(9):1095-100. doi: 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2010.03.001. Epub 2010 Mar 19.

Metabolic consequences of feeding and fasting on nutritionally different diets in the wolf spider Pardosa prativaga.

Author information

1
Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. kim.jensen@zoo.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

We investigated whether spiders fed lipid-rich rather than protein-rich prey elevate metabolism to avoid carrying excessive lipid deposits, or whether they store ingested lipids as a buffer against possible future starvation. We fed wolf spiders (Pardosa prativaga) prey of different lipid:protein compositions and measured the metabolic rate of spiders using closed respirometry during feeding and fasting. After a 16-day feeding period, spider lipid:protein composition was significantly affected by the lipid:protein composition of their prey. Feeding caused a large and fast increase in metabolism. The cost of feeding and digestion was estimated to average 21% of the ingested energy irrespective of diet. We found no difference in basal metabolic rate between dietary treatments. During starvation V ₀₂ and V(CO)₂decreased gradually, and the larger lipid stores in spiders fed lipid-rich prey appeared to extend survival of these spiders under starvation compared to spiders fed protein-rich prey. The results show that these spiders do not adjust metabolism in order to maintain a constant body composition when prey nutrient composition varies. Instead, lipids are stored efficiently and help to prepare the spiders for the long periods of food deprivation that may occur as a consequence of their opportunistic feeding strategy.

PMID:
20227417
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinsphys.2010.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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