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Int J Parasitol. 2010 Jul;40(8):979-88. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2010.02.010. Epub 2010 Mar 12.

A putative kinase-related protein (PKRP) from Plasmodium berghei mediates infection in the midgut and salivary glands of the mosquito.

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1
Institute of Parasitology and Centre for Host-Parasite Interactions, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore Road, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Que. H9X3V9, Canada.

Abstract

The completion of the Plasmodium (malaria) life cycle in the mosquito requires the parasite to traverse first the midgut and later the salivary gland epithelium. We have identified a putative kinase-related protein (PKRP) that is predicted to be an atypical protein kinase, which is conserved across many species of Plasmodium. The pkrp gene encodes a RNA of about 5300 nucleotides that is expressed as a 90kDa protein in sporozoites. Targeted disruption of the pkrp gene in Plasmodium berghei, a rodent model of malaria, compromises the ability of parasites to infect different tissues within the mosquito host. Early infection of mosquito midgut is reduced by 58-71%, midgut oocyst production is reduced by 50-90% and those sporozoites that are produced are defective in their ability to invade mosquito salivary glands. Midgut sporozoites are not morphologically different from wild-type parasites by electron microscopy. Some sporozoites that emerged from oocysts were attached to the salivary glands but most were found circulating in the mosquito hemocoel. Our findings indicate that a signalling pathway involving PbPKRP regulates the level of Plasmodium infection in the mosquito midgut and salivary glands.

PMID:
20227415
PMCID:
PMC2875340
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpara.2010.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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