Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
FEBS Lett. 2010 Jun 18;584(12):2618-25. doi: 10.1016/j.febslet.2010.03.017. Epub 2010 Mar 15.

Circadian clock control of the cellular response to DNA damage.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7260, USA. Aziz_Sancar@med.unc.edu

Abstract

Mammalian cells possess a cell-autonomous molecular clock which controls the timing of many biochemical reactions and hence the cellular response to environmental stimuli including genotoxic stress. The clock consists of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop made up of four genes/proteins, BMal1, Clock, Cryptochrome, and Period. The circadian clock has an intrinsic period of about 24 h, and it dictates the rates of many biochemical reactions as a function of the time of the day. Recently, it has become apparent that the circadian clock plays an important role in determining the strengths of cellular responses to DNA damage including repair, checkpoints, and apoptosis. These new insights are expected to guide development of novel mechanism-based chemotherapeutic regimens.

PMID:
20227409
PMCID:
PMC2878924
DOI:
10.1016/j.febslet.2010.03.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center