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Curr Opin Immunol. 2010 Apr;22(2):258-63. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2010.02.010. Epub 2010 Mar 11.

Building on dendritic cell subsets to improve cancer vaccines.

Author information

1
Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Dallas, TX, USA. karolinp@baylorhealth.edu

Abstract

T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating that the immune system can be harnessed for cancer therapy. However, such passive immunotherapy is unlikely to maintain memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth on the long term. Active immunotherapy with vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Vaccines act through dendritic cells (DCs) which induce, regulate, and maintain T cell immunity. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. The increased knowledge of the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets is leading to new trials which aim at improved immune and clinical outcomes.

PMID:
20226644
PMCID:
PMC2854185
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2010.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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