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Retina. 2010 Apr;30(4 Suppl):S15-9. doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3181cf5c80.

Peripheral retinal findings in highly myopic children < or =10 years of age.

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1
Division of Vitreoretinal Surgery, The Emory Eye Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to characterize the peripheral retinal findings in highly myopic young children without other known risk factors for retinal detachment.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of all cases of children < or =10 years of age with high myopia (>6.00 diopters) who were evaluated for presumed risk of retinal detachment by either an examination under anesthesia or office examination by a single retina specialist from January 2001 through December 2008. Patients with regressed retinopathy of prematurity, retinal detachment in the fellow eye, or known Stickler syndrome were excluded.

RESULTS:

Fifty-four eyes of 30 patients with high myopia were examined. Twenty-six eyes of 14 patients were examined under anesthesia because of the examiner's inability to adequately visualize the peripheral retina during an office examination. Mean age at examination was 6 +/- 3 (range, 1-10) years. Mean spherical equivalent refractive error was -13.88 +/- 3.79 (range, -6.00 to -25.00) diopters. Peripheral retinal findings were identified in 33% of eyes, the most common being lattice degeneration (20%), white without pressure (11%), and retinal holes with subretinal fluid (4%).

CONCLUSION:

Approximately one third of highly myopic children in our study showed peripheral retinal findings. If the peripheral retina is not adequately visualized during an office evaluation, examination under anesthesia should be considered.

PMID:
20224463
PMCID:
PMC3046106
DOI:
10.1097/IAE.0b013e3181cf5c80
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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