Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2010 Mar 5;5(3):e9560. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009560.

Binding of herpes simplex virus type-1 virions leads to the induction of intracellular signalling in the absence of virus entry.

Author information

1
Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. imacleod@hsph.harvard.edu

Abstract

The envelope of HSV-1 contains a number of glycoproteins, four of which are essential for virus entry. Virus particles lacking gB, gD, gH or gL are entry-defective, although these viruses retain the ability to bind to the plasma membrane via the remaining glycoproteins. Soluble forms of gD have been shown to trigger the nuclear translocation of the NF-kappaB transcriptional complex in addition to stimulating the production of Type I interferon. By taking advantage of the entry-defective phenotype of glycoprotein-deficient HSV-1 virus particles, the results presented here show that binding of virions to cellular receptors on the plasma membrane is sufficient to stimulate a change in cellular gene expression. Preliminary microarray studies, validated by quantitative real-time PCR, identified the differential expression of cellular genes associated with the NF-kappaB, PI3K/Akt, Jak/Stat and related Jak/Src pathways by virions lacking gB or gH but not gD. Gene induction occurred at a few particles per cell, corresponding to physiological conditions during primary infection. Reporter assay studies determined that NF-kappaB transcriptional activity is stimulated within an hour of HSV-1 binding, peaks between two and three hours post-binding and declines to background levels by five hours after induction. The immediate, transient nature of these signalling events suggests that HSV-1 glycoproteins, particularly gD, may alter the cellular environment pre-entry so as to condition the cell for viral replication.

PMID:
20221426
PMCID:
PMC2832691
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0009560
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center