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Bone Miner. 1991 Mar;12(3):167-79.

Bone particles from gallium-treated rats are resistant to resorption in vivo.

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1
Department of Biochemistry, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 10021.

Abstract

Gallium nitrate is a clinically effective agent for the treatment of cancer related hypercalcemia. The mechanism of action of this agent was investigated following development of a quantitative in vivo bone resorption assay modified from the method of Glowacki. In a preliminary study, the time course of resorption of 50 mg subcutaneous implants of bone powder in growing rats was followed by chemical analysis of mineral (ash and Ca) contents, enzymatic and histochemical assay of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity, and image analysis of changes in particle size using von Kossa stained sections. Day 21 was chosen as a single time point for the comparison of the extent of resorption of gallium-containing and control bone particles. Resorption of bone particles containing 0.39 micrograms Ga/mg bone was significantly inhibited relative to control particles. Mineral content (6.7 vs. 3.6 mg), Ca content (1.72 vs. 1.37 mg), and the percentage of the field covered by bone particles (12 vs. 9%) were greater in the animals which received gallium-containing bone particles. Similarly, the number of osteoclast-like cells and the TRAP activity in the gallium-containing bone particle implants at 21 days were increased relative to controls. These data indicate that gallium incorporation into bone matrix confers resistance to resorption.

PMID:
2021708
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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