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Am J Ophthalmol. 1991 May 15;111(5):539-47.

A population-based study of ocular abnormalities in premature children aged 5 to 10 years.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

We studied the prevalence of ocular abnormalities in 528 children born prematurely (less than 1,501-g birth weight, less than 33 weeks' gestational age, or both) in Stockholm County from 1976 to 1981. The control group consisted of 1,047 randomly selected full-term children. Through various searches of the ophthalmic records from the period of 1981 to 1986 of Stockholm County, we found that 134 of the 528 premature children (25.4%) and 121 of the 1,047 full-term children (11.5%) had needed ophthalmic care for different reasons. The prevalence of ocular abnormalities was much higher in premature children than in full-term children: reduced visual acuity of 20/33 or worse in the best eye (21 of 528 [4.0%] and one of 1,047 [0.1%]); myopia (33 of 528 [6.3%] and 18 of 1,047 [1.8%]); anisometropia of 1 diopter or greater (31 of 528 [5.9%] and 15 of 1,047 [1.5%]); strabismus (52 of 528 [9.9%] and 22 of 1,047 [2.1%]); and nystagmus (13 of 528 [2.4%] and one of 1,047 [0.1%]). Children with birth weight less than 1,000 g had the highest rates of ocular abnormalities. We conclude that visual and oculomotor development of premature children should be carefully examined.

PMID:
2021159
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9394(14)73695-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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