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Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011 Jan-Feb;52(1):99-105. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2010.02.008. Epub 2010 Mar 7.

The effects of multidimensional exercise on functional decline, urinary incontinence, and fear of falling in community-dwelling elderly women with multiple symptoms of geriatric syndrome: a randomized controlled and 6-month follow-up trial.

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1
Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 35-2 Sakaecho Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan. kimhk@tmig.or.jp

Abstract

This study assessed the effects of multidimensional exercises on functional decline, urinary incontinence, and fear of falling in community-dwelling Japanese elderly women with multiple symptoms of geriatric syndrome (MSGS). Sixty-one participants were randomly assigned either to an intervention (n=31) or to a control group (n=30). For 3-month period, the intervention group received multidimensional exercise, twice a week, aiming to increase the muscle strength, walking ability, and pelvic floor muscle (PFM). Outcome variables were measured at baseline, and after intervention and follow-up. The functional decline of the intervention group decreased from 50.0% at baseline to 16.7% after intervention and follow-up (Q=16.67, p<0.001). For urinary incontinence, the intervention group decreased from 66.7% at baseline to 23.3% after intervention and 40.0% at follow-up (Q=13.56, p=0.001), whereas the control group showed no improvement. Intervention group showed greater and significant decrease in the score of MSGS compared to control group (F=12.66, p=0.001). Within the subjects that showed improvement to normal status of MSGS, a significantly higher proportion demonstrated increased maximum walking speed at follow-up (Q=6.50, p=0.039). These results suggest that multidimensional exercise is an effective strategy for reducing geriatric syndromes in elderly population. An increase in walking ability may contribute to the improvement of MSGS.

PMID:
20211501
DOI:
10.1016/j.archger.2010.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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