Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2010 Apr;11(5):789-806. doi: 10.1517/14656561003592177.

Pharmacotherapy of systemic sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Connective Tissue Diseases, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Room G326, Memphis, TN 38163, USA. apostlethwai@uthsc.edu

Abstract

IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD:

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an uncommon autoimmune disease with variable degrees of fibroproliferation in blood vessels and certain organs of the body. There is currently no cure. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature regarding pathogenesis and treatment of complications of SSc.

AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW:

All available articles regarding research related to SSc pathogenesis and treatment listed in the PubMed database were searched; relevant articles were then reviewed and used as sources of information for this review.

WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN:

This review attempts to highlight for the reader some current thought regarding mechanisms of SSc pathogenesis and how autoimmunity relates to vascular changes and fibrogenesis of the disease, as well as providing a review of results of completed clinical trials and current ongoing clinical trials that address organ-specific or global therapies for this disease. This can aid physicians who provide medical care for patients with SSc.

TAKE HOME MESSAGE:

SSc is a complex autoimmune disease, the pathogenesis of which, although not completely understood, is under active study; new insights into pathogenesis are continually being discovered. Although there is no effective disease-modifying treatment for patients with SSc, quality of life, morbidity and mortality can be improved by using targeted therapy directed at affecting the consequences of damage to lungs, blood vessels, kidneys and the gastrointestinal tract. Innovative approaches to treating SSc are under intense investigation.

PMID:
20210685
PMCID:
PMC2837533
DOI:
10.1517/14656561003592177
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center