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Lancet. 2010 May 1;375(9725):1557-68. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61999-1. Epub 2010 Mar 5.

Community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA. fdeleo@niaid.nih.gov

Abstract

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic in hospitals worldwide, and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Health-care-associated MRSA infections arise in individuals with predisposing risk factors, such as surgery or presence of an indwelling medical device. By contrast, many community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections arise in otherwise healthy individuals who do not have such risk factors. Additionally, CA-MRSA infections are epidemic in some countries. These features suggest that CA-MRSA strains are more virulent and transmissible than are traditional hospital-associated MRSA strains. The restricted treatment options for CA-MRSA infections compound the effect of enhanced virulence and transmission. Although progress has been made towards understanding emergence of CA-MRSA, virulence, and treatment of infections, our knowledge remains incomplete. Here we review the most up-to-date knowledge and provide a perspective for the future prophylaxis or new treatments for CA-MRSA infections.

PMID:
20206987
PMCID:
PMC3511788
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61999-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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