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J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2010 Mar-Apr 1;50(2):195-9. doi: 10.1331/JAPhA.2010.09191.

Depression and diabetes: Establishing the pharmacist's role in detecting comorbidity in pregnant women.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, USA. dragland@uams.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of depression in women with diabetes receiving prenatal care and to determine whether pregnant women with comorbid depression and diabetes are receiving adequate care for depression.

SETTING:

Little Rock, AR, between June and August 2007.

PRACTICE DESCRIPTION:

At a women's health clinic providing obstetrical services to local and statewide patients, the clinical pharmacist functions as a diabetes educator, provides treatment recommendations for the OB/GYN medical residents, and precepts fourth-year student pharmacists.

PRACTICE INNOVATION:

The pharmacist and student pharmacists screened patients with diabetes for depression using the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd ed. (BDI-II).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Patient demographics, including obstetrical history, type of diabetes, depression history, and current treatments.

RESULTS:

50 patients were screened in this pilot study. Of participants, 42% reported scores that indicated clinical depression. Among patients with clinical depression, only 19% were receiving treatment for depression. Obstetrical history (number of pregnancies) showed a positive correlation with the BDI-II total scores (P = 0.0078).

CONCLUSION:

This population had a high prevalence of depressive symptoms, but very few women were receiving treatment for depression. Depression screenings should be integrated into routine prenatal care, offering adequate treatment when needed. This study implies that pharmacists can assist with screening for depression in diabetes and thus ensure that at-risk patients receive the attention needed to better manage their illnesses.

PMID:
20199962
DOI:
10.1331/JAPhA.2010.09191
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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