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J Pediatr. 1991 May;118(5):715-23.

Pancreatic endocrine function in cystic fibrosis.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Health Science Center, Minneapolis 55455.

Abstract

To characterize pancreatic endocrine secretion and to examine interrelationships among alterations in alpha, beta, and pancreatic polypeptide cell function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied 19 patients with exocrine insufficiency (EXO), including 9 receiving insulin therapy (EXO-IT); 10 patients with no exocrine insufficiency (NEXO); and 10 normal control subjects. First-phase C-peptide response to intravenously administered glucose was significantly impaired in CF patients with exocrine insufficiency (EXO-IT = 0.02 +/- 0.01; EXO = 0.11 +/- 0.02; NEXO = 0.25 +/- 0.05; control subjects = 0.30 +/- 0.04 nmol/L). Lowering fasting glucose levels with exogenous insulin administration in EXO-IT did not improve beta cell responsivity to glucose. The C-peptide response to arginine was less impaired (EXO-IT = 0.12 +/- 0.02; EXO = 0.15 +/- 0.02; NEXO = 0.23 +/- 0.06; control subjects = 0.28 +/- 0.04 nmol/L). Alpha cell function, measured as peak glucagon secretion in response to hypoglycemia, was diminished in EXO but not NEXO (EXO-IT = 21 +/- 10; EXO = 62 +/- 19; NEXO = 123 +/- 29; control subjects = 109 +/- 12 ng/L). Despite diminished glucagon response, EXO patients recovered normally from hypoglycemia. Peak pancreatic polypeptide response to hypoglycemia distinguished CF patients with exocrine insufficiency from those without exocrine insufficiency (EXO-IT = 3 +/- 2; EXO = 3 +/- 1; NEXO = 226 +/- 68; control subjects = 273 +/- 100 pmol/L). Thus CF patients with exocrine disease have less alpha, beta, and pancreatic polypeptide cell function than CF patients without exocrine disease. These data suggest either that exocrine disease causes endocrine dysfunction in CF or that a common pathogenic process simultaneously and independently impairs exocrine and endocrine function.

PMID:
2019925
DOI:
10.1016/s0022-3476(05)80032-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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