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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Jul;109(4):659-67. doi: 10.1007/s00421-010-1384-z. Epub 2010 Mar 3.

Effect of menstrual cycle phase on sprinting performance.

Author information

1
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK. ATsampoukos@hotmail.com

Abstract

This study examined the effects of menstrual cycle phase (MCP) upon sprinting and recovery as well as upon metabolic responses to such exercise. Eight females performed a repeated 30-s sprint on a non-motorised treadmill interspersed with a 2-min rest in three phases of the MCP, follicular (low 17beta-estradiol and progesterone), just prior to ovulation (midcycle trial, highest 17beta-estradiol concentration and low progesterone) and in the luteal phase (high 17beta-estradiol and high progesterone). MCP was verified later by radioimmunoassay of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone. Peak power output (PPO) and mean power output (MPO) were unaltered (P > 0.05) due to MCP [PPO for sprint 1: 463 (18) W vs. 443 (15) W vs. 449 (18) W; PPO for sprint 2: 395 (17) W vs. 359 (16) W vs. 397 (17) W; MPO for sprint 1: 302 (15) W vs. 298 (13) W vs. 298 (14) W; MPO for sprint 2: 252 (10) W vs. 248 (10) W vs. 259 (12) W for follicular, midcycle and luteal trial, mean (SEM), respectively]. Similarly, percentage recovery of PPO and MPO (the PPO or MPO during sprint 2 expressed as a percentage of the PPO or MPO during sprint 1) was also unchanged (P > 0.05). Blood lactate, blood pH and plasma ammonia after sprinting and estimated plasma volume were also unaltered by MCP (P > 0.05). These findings suggest that hormonal fluctuations due to MCP do not interfere with maximal intensity whole body sprinting and the metabolic responses to such exercise.

PMID:
20198384
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-010-1384-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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