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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jun;64(6):614-21. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2010.27. Epub 2010 Mar 3.

Berry meals and risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is commonly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes, and can thus be regarded as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. In this study we compared the effects of lifestyle intervention with and without industrial berry products, on risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome on slightly overweight women.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Sixty-one female volunteers (average age 42.9 years) were recruited and randomized for a 20-week dietary intervention trial with two parallel treatment groups, one lifestyle intervention group with berry products equaling with an average daily dose of 163 g of northern berries (berry group, diet 1, N=31, of which 28 completed the study) and the other group with lifestyle intervention only (control group, diet 2, N=30, of which 22 completed the study).

RESULTS:

Increased berry consumption as part of the normal daily diet was the only lifestyle difference between the two intervention groups. The major effects achieved by diet 1 were changes in the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) and adiponectin (at P-values <0.001 and 0.002, respectively). A statistically significant difference between the two intervention groups was the higher decrease in the ALAT value in the berry group (P=0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

The 23% decrease in the ALAT value, from 20.29 to 15.66 U/l in the berry group may be regarded as nutritionally significant by enhancing the liver function. This may contribute positively to the low-grade systemic inflammation in body and decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

PMID:
20197789
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2010.27
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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