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Blood. 2010 May 6;115(18):3664-70. doi: 10.1182/blood-2009-07-231324. Epub 2010 Mar 2.

Evaluation of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma comparing standard therapies with a novel regimen including autologous stem cell transplantation.

Author information

1
Haematological Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, United Kingdom. michal.sieniawski@ncl.ac.uk

Erratum in

  • Blood. 2011 Feb 10;117(6):2077.

Abstract

Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. At present, there are no standardized diagnostic or treatment protocols for EATL. We describe EATL in a population-based setting and evaluate a new treatment with aggressive chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). From 1979 onward the Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group prospectively collected data on all patients newly diagnosed with lymphoma in the Northern Region of England and Scotland. Between 1994 and 1998, records of all patients diagnosed with EATL were reviewed, and 54 patients had features of EATL. Overall incidence was 0.14/100 000 per year. Treatment was systemic chemotherapy (mostly anthracycline-based chemotherapy) with or without surgery in 35 patients and surgery alone in 19 patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.4 months and overall survival (OS) was 7.1 months. The novel regimen IVE/MTX (ifosfamide, etoposide, epirubicin/methotrexate)-ASCT [corrected] was piloted from 1998 for patients eligible for intensive treatment, and 26 patients were included. Five-years PFS and OS were 52% and 60%, respectively, and were significantly improved compared with the historical group treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy (P = .01 and P = .003, respectively). EATL is a rare lymphoma with an unfavorable prognosis when treated with conventional therapies. The IVE/MTX-ASCT regimen is feasible with acceptable toxicity and significantly improved outcome.

PMID:
20197551
DOI:
10.1182/blood-2009-07-231324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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