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J Biomed Mater Res A. 2010 Aug;94(2):442-9. doi: 10.1002/jbm.a.32696.

Collagen type I hydrogel allows migration, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

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1
Department of Trauma Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625, Germany. eric_hesse@hsdm.harvard.edu

Abstract

Hydrogels are potentially useful for many purposes in regenerative medicine including drug and growth factor delivery, as single scaffold for bone repair or as a filler of pores of another biomaterial in which host mesenchymal progenitor cells can migrate in and differentiate into matrix-producing osteoblasts. Collagen type I is of special interest as it is a very important and abundant natural matrix component. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) are able to adhere to, to survive, to proliferate and to migrate in collagen type I hydrogels and whether they can adopt an osteoblastic fate. rBMSCs were obtained from rat femora and plated on collagen type I hydrogels. Before harvest by day 7, 14, and 21, hydrogels were fluorescently labeled, cryo-cut and analyzed by fluorescent-based and laser scanning confocal microscopy to determine cell proliferation, migration, and viability. Osteogenic differentiation was determined by alkaline phosphatase activity. Collagen type I hydrogels allowed the attachment of rBMSCs to the hydrogel, their proliferation, and migration towards the inner part of the gel. rBMSCs started to differentiate into osteoblasts as determined by an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity after two weeks in culture. This study therefore suggests that collagen type I hydrogels could be useful for musculoskeletal regenerative therapies.

PMID:
20186733
PMCID:
PMC2891839
DOI:
10.1002/jbm.a.32696
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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