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Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2009;35(5):334-8. doi: 10.1080/00952990903075059.

Nonmedical prescription analgesic use and concurrent alcohol consumption among college students.

Author information

1
Center for Substance Abuse Research, University of Maryland, College Park, 20740, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research has linked heavy alcohol use with nonmedical prescription analgesic use, but no studies have focused on concurrent use.

OBJECTIVES:

To understand the extent to which alcohol use and nonmedical prescription analgesic use co-occur among college students.

METHODS:

The Timeline Followback method was used to split the sample (n = 1,118) into three groups based on their alcohol and nonmedical prescription analgesic use.

RESULTS:

Of all nonmedical prescription analgesic users, 58% (n = 90) were concurrent users. Concurrent users consumed more drinks per drinking day (7.5) than non-concurrent (5.8) and alcohol-only users (5.2), and drank more often (74.4% of days in the past six months, vs. 45.7% and 36.8%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE:

Concurrent alcohol and analgesic use is prevalent among nonmedical users of prescription analgesics. Findings suggest a need for heightened awareness and increased research of the risks of coingestion.

PMID:
20180661
PMCID:
PMC2829719
DOI:
10.1080/00952990903075059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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