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PLoS One. 2010 Feb 22;5(2):e9359. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009359.

DNA methylation profiles of ovarian epithelial carcinoma tumors and cell lines.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is a significant cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide and in the United States. Epithelial ovarian cancer comprises several histological subtypes, each with distinct clinical and molecular characteristics. The natural history of this heterogeneous disease, including the cell types of origin, is poorly understood. This study applied recently developed methods for high-throughput DNA methylation profiling to characterize ovarian cancer cell lines and tumors, including representatives of three major histologies.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We obtained DNA methylation profiles of 1,505 CpG sites (808 genes) in 27 primary epithelial ovarian tumors and 15 ovarian cancer cell lines. We found that the DNA methylation profiles of ovarian cancer cell lines were markedly different from those of primary ovarian tumors. Aggregate DNA methylation levels of the assayed CpG sites tended to be higher in ovarian cancer cell lines relative to ovarian tumors. Within the primary tumors, those of the same histological type were more alike in their methylation profiles than those of different subtypes. Supervised analyses identified 90 CpG sites (68 genes) that exhibited 'subtype-specific' DNA methylation patterns (FDR<1%) among the tumors. In ovarian cancer cell lines, we estimated that for at least 27% of analyzed autosomal CpG sites, increases in methylation were accompanied by decreases in transcription of the associated gene.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The significant difference in DNA methylation profiles between ovarian cancer cell lines and tumors underscores the need to be cautious in using cell lines as tumor models for molecular studies of ovarian cancer and other cancers. Similarly, the distinct methylation profiles of the different histological types of ovarian tumors reinforces the need to treat the different histologies of ovarian cancer as different diseases, both clinically and in biomarker studies. These data provide a useful resource for future studies, including those of potential tumor progenitor cells, which may help illuminate the etiology and natural history of these cancers.

PMID:
20179752
PMCID:
PMC2825254
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0009359
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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