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Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 May;30(3):210-3. doi: 10.1111/j.1475-097X.2010.00927.x. Epub 2010 Feb 17.

Effects of low-intensity resistance exercise with blood flow restriction on coagulation system in healthy subjects.

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1
Department of Ischemic Circulatory Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that even a low-intensity resistance exercise can effectively induce muscle hypertrophy and strength increase when combined with moderate blood flow restriction (BFR) into the exercising muscle. Although serious side effects of low-intensity resistance exercise with BFR have not been reported, a concern of thrombosis has been suggested, because this type of exercise is performed with restricted venous blood flow and pooling of blood in extremities. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity resistance exercise with BFR on coagulation system in healthy subjects. Ten healthy men (25.1 +/- 2.8 year) performed four sets of leg press exercises with and without BFR (150-160 mmHg) at an intensity of 30% of one-repetition maximum (1RM). In each exercise session, one set with 30 repetitions was followed by three sets with 15 repetitions. Blood samples were taken before, and 10 min, 1, 4 and 24 h after the exercise. Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (PTF) and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) were measured as markers of thrombin generation, whereas D-dimer and fibrin degradation product (FDP) were measured as markers of intravascular clot formation. Changes in plasma volume (PV) were calculated from haemoglobin and hematocrit values. PV reduction was significantly greater after the exercise with BFR than without (P<0.05). However, neither markers of thrombin generation nor intravascular clot formation increased after the exercises. These results suggest that low-intensity resistance exercise with BFR does not activate coagulation system in healthy subjects.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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