Format

Send to

Choose Destination
CNS Spectr. 2009 Nov;14(11):608-20.

The neurobiology of moral behavior: review and neuropsychiatric implications.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. mmendez@UCLA.edu

Abstract

Morality may be innate to the human brain. This review examines the neurobiological evidence from research involving functional magnetic resonance imaging of normal subjects, developmental sociopathy, acquired sociopathy from brain lesions, and frontotemporal dementia. These studies indicate a "neuromoral" network for responding to moral dilemmas centered in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and its connections, particularly on the right. The neurobiological evidence indicates the existence of automatic "prosocial" mechanisms for identification with others that are part of the moral brain. Patients with disorders involving this moral network have attenuated emotional reactions to the possibility of harming others and may perform sociopathic acts. The existence of this neuromoral system has major clinical implications for the management of patients with dysmoral behavior from brain disorders and for forensic neuropsychiatry.

PMID:
20173686
PMCID:
PMC3163302
DOI:
10.1017/s1092852900023853
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center