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Clin J Pain. 2010 Mar-Apr;26(3):227-34. doi: 10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181bed0e3.

Self-efficacy for coping with cancer in a multiethnic sample of breast cancer patients: associations with barriers to pain management and distress.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10022, USA. mosherc@mskcc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study examined the interrelations of self-efficacy for coping with cancer, perceived barriers to pain management, distress, and pain outcomes in a multiethnic sample of breast cancer patients. The extent to which ethnicity (Black, Latina, or White), language (English or Spanish), and level of education and income predicted these variables was also assessed.

METHODS:

Participants were breast cancer patients with persistent pain (N=87) who were recruited from oncology clinics in New York City. Patients completed an assessment battery that included measures of self-efficacy for coping with cancer, barriers to pain management, distress, and pain outcomes.

RESULTS:

Greater self-efficacy for coping with cancer was associated with older age, less time since diagnosis, and less distress. In addition, less self-efficacy for seeking and understanding medical information, Spanish language preference, and greater distress predicted greater barriers to pain management. Average pain severity was higher among Spanish-speaking individuals and those with lower incomes.

DISCUSSION:

Findings point to the potential importance of self-efficacy for seeking and understanding medical information and perceived barriers to pain management in understanding the psychologic well-being of breast cancer patients with pain, especially those who are Spanish-speaking.

PMID:
20173437
PMCID:
PMC2827812
DOI:
10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181bed0e3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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