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J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2010 Feb;21(1):70-80. doi: 10.1353/hpu.0.0256.

Ambulatory medical care in rural Haiti.

Author information

1
rniska@comcast.net

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In 2005, a team of U.S. physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, emergency medical technicians and lay support personnel provided health services in an isolated town in rural Haiti.

METHODS:

During one week, the team saw 788 patients. They recorded age, sex, vital signs, diagnoses, and treatments in an electronic database. A descriptive analysis is presented.

RESULTS:

Intestinal parasitosis was the third most common diagnosis overall, and the most common diagnosis for children. For adults aged 50 years or older, 52% of women and 37% of men had elevated blood pressures, significantly more than adults aged 15-49 years.

DISCUSSION:

This paper focuses on intestinal parasitosis and hypertension. Periodic anti-helminthic treatment and community sanitation are discussed as ways to reduce the burden of parasites and secondary malnutrition. Challenges to implementing a sustainable antihypertensive program are discussed, including patient education, medication availability and prioritization, and adequate follow-up in a very austere rural setting.

PMID:
20173256
DOI:
10.1353/hpu.0.0256
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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