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Biol Psychiatry. 2010 May 1;67(9):800-3. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.12.028. Epub 2010 Feb 20.

Serotonin 1B receptor imaging in alcohol dependence.

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  • 1Molecular Imaging Program, Clinical Neurosciences Division, VA National Center for PTSD, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although animal models suggest that alcohol dependence (AD) is associated with elevations in the number of serotonin 1B receptors (5-HT(1B)R), 5-HT(1B)R levels have not been investigated in people with AD. The selective 5-HT(1B)R antagonist radioligand, [(11)C]P943, permits in vivo assessment of central 5-HT(1B)R binding potential (BP(ND)) with positron emission tomography. Because of its central role in AD, we were particularly interested in ventral striatal 5-HT(1B)R BP(ND) values.

METHODS:

Twelve medication-free, recently abstinent (at least 4 weeks) patients with AD (mean age 35.2 +/- 10.2 years, 5 women) and 12 healthy control subjects (HC) (mean age 30.6 +/- 9.2 years, 5 women) completed [(11)C]P943 positron emission tomography on a high-resolution research tomograph. Individual magnetic resonance imaging scans were collected to exclude individuals with anatomical abnormalities and for coregistration. Imaging data were analyzed with a multilinear reference tissue model.

RESULTS:

Ventral striatal 5-HT(1B)R BP(ND) values (2.01 +/- .57% and 1.55 +/- .09%, respectively; 29% between-group difference, p = .006) were increased in AD compared with HC subjects. No influence of demographic or clinical variables or amount of injected radiotracer was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides the first evidence that AD in humans is, like in rodent models, associated with increased levels of ventral striatal 5-HT(1B)Rs.

PMID:
20172504
PMCID:
PMC3112181
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.12.028
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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