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Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 May;30(5):968-75. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.201129. Epub 2010 Feb 18.

Evidence that niacin inhibits acute vascular inflammation and improves endothelial dysfunction independent of changes in plasma lipids.

Author information

1
Lipid Research Group, Heart Research Institute, 7 Eliza St, Newtown, New South Wales, Australia 2042.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if niacin can confer cardiovascular benefit by inhibiting vascular inflammation and improving endothelial function independent of changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

New Zealand white rabbits received normal chow or chow supplemented with 0.6% or 1.2% (wt/wt) niacin. This regimen had no effect on plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein levels. Acute vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction were induced in the animals with a periarterial carotid collar. At the 24-hour postcollar implantation, the endothelial expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was markedly decreased in the niacin-supplemented animals compared with controls. Niacin also inhibited intima-media neutrophil recruitment and myeloperoxidase accumulation, enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation and cyclic guanosine monophosphate production, increased vascular reduced glutathione content, and protected against hypochlorous acid-induced endothelial dysfunction and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced vascular inflammation.

CONCLUSION:

Previous human intervention studies have demonstrated that niacin inhibits coronary artery disease. This benefit is thought to be because of its ability to reduce low-density lipoprotein and plasma triglyceride levels and increase high-density lipoprotein levels. The present study showed that niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and protects against endothelial dysfunction independent of these changes in plasma lipid levels.

PMID:
20167660
DOI:
10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.201129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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