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Am J Emerg Med. 2010 Feb;28(2):235-42. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2008.11.015.

Routine testing in patients with asymptomatic elevated blood pressure in the ED.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. daniel.nishijima@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

There are no clear recommendations for the diagnostic evaluation of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with asymptomatic elevated blood pressure. In patients presenting with asymptomatic elevated blood pressure in the ED, we measured the prevalence of abnormalities on a basic metabolic profile (BMP) that led to hospital admission as well as the prevalence of diminished renal function.

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional study at 2 urban teaching EDs with a largely African American population. Adult patients (> or = 18 years) with a triage diastolic blood pressure (BP) 100 mm Hg or higher and without symptoms suggestive of acute end-organ damage were enrolled. All patients had a BMP sent. The primary outcome measured was abnormalities on the BMP that led to hospital admission. The secondary outcome measured was the prevalence of diminished renal function (glomerular filtration rate <60 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2)).

RESULTS:

One hundred sixty-seven patients with asymptomatic elevated BP were studied. Twelve (7.2%; 95% confidence interval, 3%-11%) patients were admitted due to abnormal results on the BMP. Twenty-seven (16.2%; 95% confidence interval, 11%-21%) patients met the secondary outcome measure of diminished renal function (glomerular filtration rate <60 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2)).

CONCLUSION:

In a homogenous African American population presenting to the ED with asymptomatic elevated BP, there is a relatively high prevalence of abnormalities on the BMP that led to hospital admission. We suggest routine testing of a serum creatinine should be strongly considered in a largely African American patient population with asymptomatic elevated BP in the ED.

PMID:
20159398
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2008.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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