Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Prev Chronic Dis. 2010 Mar;7(2):A35. Epub 2010 Feb 15.

Impact of a multimedia campaign to increase intention to call 9-1-1 for stroke symptoms, upstate New York, 2006-2007.

Author information

1
University at Albany School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy, Management, and Behavior, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA. jjurkowski@albany.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Many people are not aware of stroke symptoms, the need for emergency care for those symptoms, and that calling 9-1-1 is recommended. The New York State Department of Health developed and implemented a multimedia campaign to increase stroke symptom awareness and awareness of the need to call 9-1-1.

METHODS:

The evaluation of the campaign's impact was a pre/post intervention matched comparison design. A random-digit-dialed list-assisted telephone survey was administered to measure reach of the campaign and change in intention to seek emergency care for stroke by calling 9-1-1 in response to 4 signs or symptoms.

RESULTS:

A larger proportion of respondents in the intervention region than in the comparison region reported seeing a stroke advertisement and reported the advertisement's message was to call 9-1-1. There was a significant increase between baseline and follow-up in intention to call 9-1-1 for the 4 stroke symptoms. These increases were greater in the intervention region than the comparison region. The differences between intervention and comparison groups in the increases in intention to call 9-1-1 ranged from 9% to 12% for specific stroke symptoms identified in oneself and from 4% to 12% for symptoms identified in another person.

CONCLUSION:

This multimedia campaign effectively increased intention to call 9-1-1 for stroke symptoms in the intervention region compared with a region matched for demographics and stroke rates. Multimedia campaigns are effective in increasing awareness of stroke symptoms and intention to immediately call 9-1-1.

PMID:
20158963
PMCID:
PMC2831789
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center