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Arch Dermatol. 2010 Feb;146(2):143-6. doi: 10.1001/archdermatol.2009.355.

Modern moulage: evaluating the use of 3-dimensional prosthetic mimics in a dermatology teaching program for second-year medical students.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, 609 Albany St, Room J207, Boston, MA 02118, USA. agarg@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the effectiveness of a teaching method that uses 3-dimensional (3D) silicone-based prosthetic mimics of common serious lesions and eruptions and to compare learning outcomes with those achieved through the conventional method of lectures with 2-dimensional (2D) images.

DESIGN:

Prospective and comparative.

SETTING:

University of Massachusetts Medical School.

PARTICIPANTS:

Ninety second-year medical students.

INTERVENTION:

A 1-hour teaching intervention using a lecture with 2D images (2D group) or using 3D prosthetic mimics of lesions and eruptions (3D group).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Mean scores in the domains of morphology, lesion and rash recognition, lesion and rash management, and overall performance assessed at baseline, immediately after, and 3 months after each group's respective teaching intervention.

RESULTS:

Immediately after the teaching intervention, the 3D group had significantly higher mean percentage scores than did the 2D group for overall performance (71 vs 65, P = .03), lesion recognition (65 vs 56, P = .02), and rash management (80 vs 67, P = .01). Three months later, the 3D group still had significantly higher mean percentage scores than did the 2D group for lesion recognition (47 vs 40, P = .03). The 3D group better recognized lesions at 3 months compared with at baseline, whereas the 2D group was no better at recognizing lesions at 3 months compared with at baseline.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite limited curricular time, the novel teaching method using 3D prosthetic mimics of lesions and eruptions improves immediate and long-term learning outcomes, in particular, lesion recognition. It is also a preferred teaching format among second-year medical students.

PMID:
20157024
DOI:
10.1001/archdermatol.2009.355
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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