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Sleep Med. 2010 Mar;11(3):289-94. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2009.09.007. Epub 2010 Feb 13.

Short sleep duration is associated with poor performance on IQ measures in healthy school-age children.

Author information

1
Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. reut.gruber@douglas.mcgill.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the associations between habitual sleep duration and intellectual functioning in healthy, well-rested, school-age children.

METHODS:

The study group consisted of 39 healthy children, aged 7-11 years old. Nightly actigraphic sleep recordings were taken for four consecutive nights to determine habitual week-night sleep duration in the home environment. Objective measures of cognitive functioning and sleepiness were used to measure daytime functioning.

RESULTS:

Longer habitual sleep duration in healthy school-age participants was associated with better performance on measures of perceptual reasoning and overall IQ, as measured by the WISC-IV, and on reported measures of competence and academic performance. No association between sleep duration and the studied behavioral measures was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support the hypothesis that sleep duration is differentially related to some components of cognitive functioning, even in the absence of evidence for sleep deprivation or attention deficits.

PMID:
20156702
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2009.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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