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Neurosci Lett. 2010 Mar 31;473(1):42-7. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2010.02.015. Epub 2010 Feb 12.

Neuronal activities of forebrain structures with respect to bladder contraction in cats.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. tatsuya-yamamoto@mbc.nifty.com

Abstract

The forebrain is one of the important suprapontine micturition centres. Previous studies have shown that electrical stimulation of the frontal lobe and the anterior cingulate gyrus elicited either inhibition or facilitation of bladder contraction. Patients with frontal lobe tumours and aneurysms showed micturition disorders. Functional brain imaging studies showed that several parts of the forebrain are activated during bladder filling. We aimed to examine neuronal activities of forebrain structures with respect to bladder contraction in cats. In 14 adult male cats under ketamine anaesthesia in which a spontaneous isovolumetric bladder-contraction/relaxation cycle had been generated, we carried out extracellular single-unit recording in forebrain with respect to the contraction/relaxation cycles in the bladder. We recorded 112 neurons that were related to the bladder-contraction/relaxation cycles. Ninety-four neurons were found to be tonically activated during the bladder-relaxation phase, whereas the remaining 18 neurons were tonically activated during the bladder-contraction phase. Both types of neuron were widely distributed around the cruciate sulcus. Most were located medially (medial and superior frontal gyrus) and the rest were located laterally (middle and inferior frontal gyrus). Neurons recorded in forebrain structures were activated with respect to the contraction/relaxation cycles in the bladder. Forebrain structures may have a significant role in regulating bladder contraction in cats.

PMID:
20153810
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2010.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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